Coptic Orthodox Church 2017-01-23T08:22:22+00:00

The See of St. Mark the Apostle

The home of St. Mark the Apostle is well known in all Apostolic Churches as the first church in the world. Being the writer of one of the four Holy Gospels and also being one of the 70 Apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ, St. Mark has been the cornerstone for preaching Christianity in Europe and North Africa.

Founded by St. Mark the Apostle, in the first century, in Egypt, the Coptic orthodox church is one of the most ancient christian churches to exist. For several generations, the church has carefully preserved many Apostolic doctrines, traditions and ways of worship, introduced from the time of St. Mark.

Having entered Egypt in 61 AD, St. Mark began his mission to preach the word of God to all those that he came across, including Ananias the cobbler and his family. In 62 AD, before St. Mark left Egypt, he ordained Ananias as Bishop and founded a church in Crypt, where the Holy family resided in during their travels in Egypt. Upon the return of St. Mark in Egypt, after the martyrdom of St. Peter and St. Paul, St. Mark ordained three priests and seven deacons to assist Bishop Ananias, as well as opening more churches around Egypt.

St. Mark preached more about Christianity within the land of Egypt for another seven years, before he was martyred by the pagan Egyptians in 68 AD. St. Mark is the first of the unbroken line of Patriarchs of the Coptic orthodox church. His Holiness Pope Tawadros II is the present Patriarch, being the 118th Pope of Alexandria.

The See of St. Mark the Apostle

The home of St. Mark the Apostle is well known in all Apostolic Churches as the first church in the world. Being the writer of one of the four Holy Gospels and also being one of the 70 Apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ, St. Mark has been the cornerstone for preaching Christianity in Europe and North Africa.

Founded by St. Mark the Apostle, in the first century, in Egypt, the Coptic orthodox church is one of the most ancient christian churches to exist. For several generations, the church has carefully preserved many Apostolic doctrines, traditions and ways of worship, introduced from the time of St. Mark.

Having entered Egypt in 61 AD, St. Mark began his mission to preach the word of God to all those that he came across, including Ananias the cobbler and his family. In 62 AD, before St. Mark left Egypt, he ordained Ananias as Bishop and founded a church in Crypt, where the Holy family resided in during their travels in Egypt. Upon the return of St. Mark in Egypt, after the martyrdom of St. Peter and St. Paul, St. Mark ordained three priests and seven deacons to assist Bishop Ananias, as well as opening more churches around Egypt.

St. Mark preached more about Christianity within the land of Egypt for another seven years, before he was martyred by the pagan Egyptians in 68 AD. St. Mark is the first of the unbroken line of Patriarchs of the Coptic orthodox church. His Holiness Pope Tawadros II is the present Patriarch, being the 118th Pope of Alexandria.

Martyrdom

Martyrdom has been at the heart of the Coptic Orthodox Church for hundreds and thousands of years. Whether it was from the time of when Septimus Severus was in power or from when the Roman Emperor Diocletian took to the throne, the Coptic Christians were continuously being persecuted.

To acknowledge martyrdom within the Church, the Coptic Church determined to start its calendar from the year of Diocletian’s accession to the throne in 248 AD, calling the calendar `Anno Martyrii’, meaning, `Of the Martyrs.’ Up until now the Church is still classified as the Church of martyrs, with more modern martyrs being recognised by the world, like the 21 Coptic Christians martyred in Libya for their faith, in 2015.

Martyrdom

Martyrdom has been at the heart of the Coptic Orthodox Church for hundreds and thousands of years. Whether it was from the time of when Septimus Severus was in power or from when the Roman Emperor Diocletian took to the throne, the Coptic Christians were continuously being persecuted.

To acknowledge martyrdom within the Church, the Coptic Church determined to start its calendar from the year of Diocletian’s accession to the throne in 248 AD, calling the calendar `Anno Martyrii’, meaning, `Of the Martyrs.’ Up until now the Church is still classified as the Church of martyrs, with more modern martyrs being recognised by the world, like the 21 Coptic Christians martyred in Libya for their faith, in 2015.

Monasticism

Beginning in the end of the third century and flourishing in the fourth century, monasticism has been at the core of the Coptic Orthodox Church. In the early days of the Church, hundreds of monasteries and thousands of caves were established in the mountains of Egypt. For the monks, monasticism was the life of prayer, contemplation, solitude, worship and purity of heart.

Whether, the monk lived in complete seclusion like the anchorites or hermits, or they lived within the monastery, they contributed to the most profound spiritual revival in the history of the Coptic Church. Saints such as Saint Anthony (251-356 AD), or Saint Macarius the Great (300-390 AD), were not preachers, but they were living sermons, examples of the true life and the image of God on earth.

Monasticism

Beginning in the end of the third century and flourishing in the fourth century, monasticism has been at the core of the Coptic Orthodox Church. In the early days of the Church, hundreds of monasteries and thousands of caves were established in the mountains of Egypt. For the monks, monasticism was the life of prayer, contemplation, solitude, worship and purity of heart.

Whether, the monk lived in complete seclusion like the anchorites or hermits, or they lived within the monastery, they contributed to the most profound spiritual revival in the history of the Coptic Church. Saints such as Saint Anthony (251-356 AD), or Saint Macarius the Great (300-390 AD), were not preachers, but they were living sermons, examples of the true life and the image of God on earth.